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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 15, 2018 11:00am-1:00pm GMT

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11: one of britain's biggest construction firms, carillion, has been put into liquidation — 20,000 workers face an uncertain future. it is about a great regret that this liquidation has taken place. the government's priority rightly has been to ensure protection for key public services. this company issued three profit warnings in the last six months yet despite those profit warnings, the government still continue to grant contracts to this company. the leader of ukip says he's no longer dating a model who sent racist texts about prince harry's fiancee, meghan markle. the cost of a hard brexit for scotland's ecenomy — a warning from it could amount to more than £12 billion a year. the uk is to give a towards
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vaccinating rohingya children. also cyrille regis, a pioneer for black footballers, dies at the age of 59. what a great shot. tributes are paid to the former west brom striker, who made his name in the late 1970s. and a narrow escape for a driver and passenger — how they escaped with only minor injuries from this car crash in the us. good morning. it's monday 15th january. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the construction firm, carillion, has gone into liquidation. government officials had been involved in talks to try to prevent
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the collapse of the company, which owes banks about £900 million. this morning the government said public services provided by carillion will continue. the company employs 20,000 people in the uk. carillion holds approximately a50 contracts with government. some of the projects include the new hs2 rail line and managing nearly 900 school buildings across the country. they are the second largest supplier of maintenance services to network rail and operate £200 million worth of prison contracts, as well as providing cleaning and catering in hospitals. speaking this morning, the cabinet secretary david lidington reassured workers on public sector contracts they will continue to receive their wages and the government will ensure public services will continue. it's a matter of great regret that this liquidation has taken place but the government's priority, rightly, has been to ensure protection for key public services.
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so, that's why we have signed up with the supported administration today through the official receiver because that means that administration will be conducted in an orderly fashion. we as government will continue to pay the wages and salaries of employees working on those public sector contracts. they can come into work today knowing that that is the position and they will, we'll be paying their salaries today through the official receiver, not through carillion into a different bank account, but that money has always been in our budget. the labour shadow business secretary rebecca long bailey described the news of the liquidation as a worrying development. we're also asking for a full investigation into the government's conduct of this matter. this company issued three profit warnings in the last six months, yet despite this profit warnings, the government still continue to grant contracts to this company.
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now this completely contrevened government policy, their strategic management of risks, they were entitled to deem this company as high risk if profit warnings were issued, they didn't do this. they should've ensured that a crown official was appointed to deal with the company and mitigate any potential losses that might have occurred. with me now is our business correspondent ben thompson. good morning. the reach of carillion into so many aspects of life has been huge. what went wrong with the business? it is notjust here in the uk, that is the focus of most of the attention today but also around the world carillion on a very big operator in canada and parts of the middle east to and that is part of its problem. it overstretch itself, many critics would say. they took on too much too quickly, they bought too much too quickly, they bought too many firms, took on too many big projects and they were not paid. a
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lot of projects in the middle east they have started as not being paid on time, that has meant they have had cash flow problems. a lot of the issues in the uk, they simply took on too much. bidding at it to gp bat a bit too cheaply for contracts. we got her position today where the depth of the huge that the liquidators have said this but cannot continue. just a word on the liquidation rather than administration, a company will go m, administration, a company will go in, try to look at what is salvageable within the firm, run it asa salvageable within the firm, run it as a going concern, get it back on an even keel, what we are seeing todayis an even keel, what we are seeing today is the most serious. it is liquidation. this is the liquidators going in and saying, we need to find what bits of this business we can sell off the people we own and that is the end of the line. and that is the end of the line. i very important distinguish to make. the nuts and bolts of these contracts, what will happen to them? the fact, we touched how many elements that did this business.
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they provide everything from cleaning hospitals, building roads and railways, running prisons, providing school dinner, so many aspects of our life and that is why it is complicated to work out what will happen with these. while we know so far as the one that on the public domain, the public sector, schools and hospitals, they will continue as normal, the government will make sure they continue. you heard that that staff working in the public sector should turn up, they will be paid. also with the you maybe have a pension with carillion, they have been told that their pension is safe. it is protected. they say. but what is not clear is what happens to be private contracts, the wansbeck carillion was building in the private sector and whether many of the subcontractors that works in the company will be paid because we might be in a position now where this is something we watched very closely today, we might be in a position where the subcontractors are going to cite and saying, we are not working because we do not know what is going to happen or if we are
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going to be paid. we may see some of them taking their equipment off their sites it is we may get a position where everybody tried to get their money from this business. if they are removing expensive equipment, one of the big companies that the huge supplier to carillion, they random things like figures, the shares are down pretty significantly this morning. big exposure to other firms. thank you for the moment. with me now is peter pilsner — our midlands business correspondent, who's in wolverhampton outside the carillion headquarters. 200,000 jobs here in the uk, sorry, 20,000 jobs at stake, what is the reaction been there so far today? the reaction has been sadness and dismay and surprised up until this morning, i think most people were fairly convinced that they might be some kind of deal reached that at least would give the company a stay of execution for the next few
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months. that was not to be. today, with the workers going on in a sombre mood, no one wanting to comment to the media. i have seen what i think are administration receivers start going in, they are clearly taking up work already. certainly one of the big things is, i ben were saying, these small contractors who work the carillion, what happens to them, some of them are owed money, it is unlikely they will get any of the money they are owed back, ithink. the will get any of the money they are owed back, i think. the head of the chamber of commerce has said that the real immediate things that need to happen our reassurance that those small contractors. he says they are contractors all over the country he woke up this morning and now they are not sure whether they will have worked at the end of the week. certainly not good for those smaller firms will stop some of these private contracts that carillion was doing, one of those within the centre of birmingham where massive regeneration project is taking place. i am told that that scheme is
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about 80% complete and the private firm that is building it will bring in another contractor to i guess com plete in another contractor to i guess complete the work. different story at another project just a few complete the work. different story at another projectjust a few miles away, a new super hospital, that was being funded by carillion and they would've got their money by charging a mortgage over the next 30 years or so. a mortgage over the next 30 years or so. still do not know what is happening with that product but i guess that is one of the project that will be supported by the government, in fact, that will be supported by the government, infact, i know government, in fact, i know from a statement from the nhs trust dealing with that hospital. they said they are working closely with the treasury and the hospital company thatis treasury and the hospital company that is building at as the alternate arrangements to be put in place. people working with brain are part of our local community and we will do everything we can to support them. —— working with carillion. thank you. we can speak to the general secretary of the gmb workers union, tim roache. thank you forjoining us. you said
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you would like these context to be brought back in—house. you would like these context to be brought back in-house. explain what you mean by that. we are talking here about public sector contracts, contracts to clean hospitals, the clean schools and cater for schoolchildren. and prisons. these conflicts that have been put up into the private sector. the problem with private sector companies taking on public sector contracts is these private companies are looking for profit first rather than making sure that the services, the contracts are delivered. what we are saying as a result of this debacle, i had the government minister thing it is with great regret, it certainly is, the tens of thousands people we represent, talk about a blue monday, it really is. the taxpayer would be taking on the risks, wouldn't they? absolutely, yes. as many, public sector conduct up and down the uk are administered in—house by local authorities, properly funded, that is exactly what should have happened
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with these contracts. instead they have been put out to tender, carillion by the omission of the person you interviewed has overstretch itself, over bid itself, what that has led to is a race to the bottom on employees and it has gone bang. the other thing i need to say is the common thing they have been watching this closely. they clearly have not. they have been asleep at the wheel. there have been three profit warnings back injuly and yet they have still wanted more and yet they have still wanted more and more contracts. it isa and more contracts. it is a scam. higham gum asserted was done behind the wages of public service and public service employees. of course i am delighted. i have a number of our members contact me this morning saying what on earth is going on? do i turn up for work? of course you do. we welcome the government's immediate response to say these jobs, those terms and conditions will be safeguarded for now. how long will that last? what happens with the private sector building contractors as well? what we are saying is festival, there
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must be a complete and immediate moratorium on any public sector context being awarded externally and when this is all been settled, we need to have a proper independent open transparent enquiry into how on earth this happened and how it can never happen again. thank you very much for your time. let's get some more political reaction to this now from our assistant political editor norman smith. many questions being asked at westminster today and indeed around the country. questions about why the government continued to issue substantial contracts to carillion last summer and indeed last september when two different profit warnings were made. there is an media pressure —— immediate pressure on the gum to why the contract was given the hs2 just one week after a profit warning and then a subsequent contract for the electrification of the london to corby line after a second profit warning. there is an immediate
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pressure on the government to explain how that happened. there is a broader pressure as well because this whole carillion demise has ignited the debate about the extent to which many, many public services are now provided by these huge private contractors. something like £270 billion a year spent by the public sector on private contractors doing everything from school dinners, the cleaning hospitals, the looking after military bases. calls now from labour and from the trade unions for review of that balance. in the immediate future, the demand of labour and the unions as we have been hearing, if all those employed by carillion to be taken on to the state ‘s books either by the government directly or by nhs trusts oi’ government directly or by nhs trusts or by local councils and service contracts or by local councils and service co ntra cts to or by local councils and service contracts to be nationalised. also interesting listening to tender
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thing there should be a moratorium on the future handing out of contract is the big private contractors. i think that underlines the extent to which this is now becoming the central area of debate, how far the state should hand over responsibility for running large swathes of the public sector to private contractors. switching topics, i want to you buddy ukip leader henry bolton, he was often choose between his job and his girlfriend, he chose hisjob. actually is that enough to save him in that position? i think that is open to question because already some of his critics are simply renewed their calls for him to go. bill average, the uk and epjust a short him to go. bill average, the uk and ep just a short time ago described him as useless and a lightweight and destruction. it is not silenced his critics. they are still demanding he go. i suppose what may project is the ukip membership because before you can get rid of the ukip leader, you can get rid of the ukip leader, you have to secure notjust the
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backing of the party, they are due to meet next week and, you have to secure the majority of party members ata secure the majority of party members at a special meeting. party members ta ke at a special meeting. party members take a more sympathetic view of mr bolton than he could perhaps carry on, you just have a sense this is a party lynching from crisis to crisis and frankly are diminishing releva nce and frankly are diminishing relevance in the wake of the brexit referendum really struggling to carve out a new role and a identity for itself. 0k, thank you very much, norman smith out westminster. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: carillion is entering compulsory liquidation after talks to tackle its debts failed. the leader of ukip says he is no longer dating a model who was revealed the extent reifers text about prince harry's fiance, meghan markle. —— racist texts.
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a study by scottish government officials is warning that a hard brexit could cut scotland's economy by more than twelve billion pounds per year. cyrille regis has died at the age of 59. scott on june 12 cyrille regis has died at the age of 59. scott onjune 12 goals in his time. rio ferdinand called him a great man who would always be remembered. ryan giggs is expected to be named as the new manager of wales this afternoon. it will be his first full—timejob in afternoon. it will be his first full—time job in management. afternoon. it will be his first full—timejob in management. he took charge of manchester united the four games back in 2014 after david moyes was sacked. britain's kyle edmund has enjoyed the biggest win of his career, beating the 11th seed kevin anderson in five steps to reach the second round of the australian open in melbourne. i will be back with more of those stories just after half past. nicola sturgeon has called on the
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uk, to drop what she described as its redline, brexit. the gum and i westminster insist that it is seeking a deal that will work for the whole of the uk. —— government. lorna joins us now. the study was looking at three of the, the impact of three different outcomes of brexit. take through the main points if you would. new year, if you like, i reboot on the argument over brexit, a slightly different location for first minister's press conference, normally she would be holding that at the residents that the house is undergoing repairs at the moment. instead it was held in the hole behind me —— south. she takes us through the potential scenarios at the uk leaving the eu, nicola
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sturgeon saying this analysis is far more detailed than anything provided so more detailed than anything provided so far by the uk government and the three scenarios she goes into are, of course, the uk staying in the single market. a preferentialfree trade canada style agreement and the so—called hard brexit under world trade organisation rules. let me very clear this analysis shows that none of these options are as good as staying in eu. our economy will take a hit under all of them. however least damaging option by far is staying in the single market. these are just projections but they are these are just projections but they a re pretty these are just projections but they are pretty detailed. this analysis suggest that staying in the single market would cost every single person here in scotland £700, free trade agreement would cost every person in scotland £1600 while no
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deal at all with cost every single person £2300 by the year 2030. interestingly nicola sturgeon also talks about being in favour very strongly, in favour of the free movement of people. she says that is absolutely essential for scotland going forward. she calls this the greatest national challenge and she said it is a duty to make the case the free movement because all projected population scenarios for scotla nd projected population scenarios for scotland say that without migration, the population of scotland would drop. she says this is the moment for moderate voices as she sees it to come together to argue the case for the single market. she as a very small window of opportunity. she is calling in particular the jeremy corbyn and labour to join calling in particular the jeremy corbyn and labour tojoin her ankles to remain in the single market. he appears to have rejected that. the
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uk, have responded and say they are seeking a brexit deal that works in the united kingdom. —— the uk government. thank you. barry mcelduff, the sinn fein mp who caused controversy over a social media post which unionists said mocked victims of the ira, has resigned. mr mcelduff posted a video of himself on twitter with a loaf of kingsmill bread on his head, on the 42nd anniversary of the murders of ten protestants in the village of kingsmills in county armagh. he was suspended by his party for three months, but this morning he has announced he is standing down as an mp. let's talk to our ireland correspondent chris page who is in belfast. just remind us about the serves massacre and why that social media posed by barry mcelduff was so helpful. —— kingsmill. it was one of the most dreadful atrocities throughout the troubles here in
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northern ireland. it happened in the mid—19 70s at a village called kingsmill. republican gunmen stopped a minibus which was carrying textile workers home from work and they were shot dead, ten men. it is raw beet are connected to those killings in the community where it happened. 0n the community where it happened. 0n the 42nd anniversary of those killings, barry mcelduff, the sinn fein mp, posted a video on twitter as him in a supermarket with a loaf of kingsmill bread on his head. there was widespread condemnation of those. the only survivor of the kingsmill massacre said that mr mcelduff with a bigot who had danced on the grave of victims. mr mcelduff said he did not know it was the anniversary, he did not mean to cause any harm. he was suspended for three months but all the other party said that was not good enough. today he has announced he is resigning as the mp. he has repeated that there was no intended reference he says to
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the kingsmill massacre in his suite that mr mcelduff says he does accept there are many people who do not believe him and he also accepts that this view of what happens is deeply damaging to the reconciling process in northern ireland. he is standing down as member parliament. do you think this was a decision he has arrived at independently rather than being pushed further from within the party and as a second point to this question, do you think that this will, in any way, help the ready difficult relationship between the two main parties there, sinn fein and the dup? there has been a year of political i’ows there has been a year of political rows since the stormont executive, the devolved gunmen of northern ireland collapsed just over 12 months ago. nobody really saw this i’ow months ago. nobody really saw this row involving barry mcelduff coming. —— the devolved government. he wa nted —— the devolved government. he wanted to resign, there was a lot of
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political pressure on him and the party, a really dominated politics here for the last seven or eight days. relations between the parties, the dup leader says it is right barry mcelduff has resigned, she goes on that now is the time for sinn fein to learn the lessons from these dark events and deal with the fa ct these dark events and deal with the fact that that sinn fein and many of its members continue to publicly call affright the murderous deeds of the past, the murders of the ira. she says sinn fein has much more to do to them should they have learned from these events. 0ver do to them should they have learned from these events. over the weekend, mrs from these events. over the weekend, m rs foster from these events. over the weekend, mrs foster made a speech about brexit, she used conciliatory language which many thought was designed to repair the damage done to relations between the dup and the irish gum and in particular to the brexit negotiations before christmas. she says things like brexit is not about beating and cutting ourselves from our nearest neighbour. last week was about
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lowering politics there. —— brexit is not about wielding a wall. you get the impression but they are ten to ta ke get the impression but they are ten to take the sting out of the situation, talks to restore devolution in the coming weeks. despite what happened over the last weekend and mr mcelduff's resignation today, i do not think anything has changed. maybe the mood will improve somewhat. chris, thank you very much. let's look at some of today's other developing stories. police in east yorkshire believe they've found the body of a man, suspected of using a crossbow to kill his neighbour. officers in humberside began searching for 56—year—old anthony lawrence, following the death of shane gilmer on friday. his pregnant girlfriend, laura sugden, was also seriously wounded in the attack. sir richard branson has told
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virgin trains to restock the daily mail, saying the company's sales ban amounted to censorship. sir richard said the decision by virgin trains, which took the daily mail off its trains in november after deciding it was "not compatible" with its brand or beliefs was done without his knowledge. the daily mail called the ban "disgraceful" and an attack on freedom of speech. a leading charity is claiming thousands of parents in england are struggling to pay nursery fees, because of problems accessing a government website. the pre—school learning alliance says glitches on the hmrc site mean some parents are missing out on their right to 30 hours free childcare or tax breaks. but the government says fewer than two per cent of parents who have opened accounts had encountered problems. for a full summary of the news, you can go to our website where you'll be able to get more details on those stories. tributes are being paid
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to the former west brom and england forward, cyrille regis, who has died aged 59. an outstanding striker and a pioneer for black footballers in england during the late 1970s, he played for ‘the baggies' between 1977 and 1984. he went on to win the fa cup with coventry in 1987 and returned to the hawthorns as a coach before becoming an agent. ageing, thank you for coming along and condolences on the loss of your friend. so young. so young, every time you saw cyril, you thought he was getting younger all the time. he was a magnificent physical specimen of the play, every time i saw him, i set him just before christmas, what
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is your secret? he seemed to get better physically the time. it was how everyone else felt about him but i can't, thank you for your condolences to me, there are so many people who are so close to him. in the midlands especially, in the game generally, every black footballer i know of a certain age and many others, ian wright would be one who would be speechless this morning, could not find the words. he was such an inspiration, such a trailblazer and my particular thoughts are with brendan today. three black players at the west bromwich the 70s, these three degrees, , bromwich the 70s, these three degrees,, one who died in a car crash many years ago now, it isjust brendan last. i can't imagine how he will be feeling this morning, him and cyrille were very close indeed. they believe such a trail. i cannot explain to you what it was like to be there in the 70s. a little white
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kid from a middle—class area, the area around birmingham and the black country, a few teething problems to say the least, there was a lot of racial tension that and suddenly these three, but sony, cyrille burst onto the scene and so quick and powerful and just so feared by the opposition. there we were, i load of white people just loving opposition. there we were, i load of white peoplejust loving it. opposition. there we were, i load of white people just loving it. just adoring him. he had such an impact. what did he say to you about that time coming up through the game about his love for the game, also about his love for the game, also about the racial abuse? hejust said, the about the racial abuse? he just said, the documentary i made, what i learned from it was i was there at the time that you kind of forgot how bad it was for them and getting them just to tell those tales, having bananas raining down on them, monkey noises. racist taunts from opposition fans but also opposition players and even their
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own players actually in the dressing room. it was just so hard. own players actually in the dressing room. it wasjust so hard. many players did not have been mental strength to do it. there were some great footballers who never got it because they were never as mentally strong as brendan and cyrille. what they both did, theyjust channelled it, they just they both did, theyjust channelled it, theyjust channelled the anger, channelled the hatred and it made them better players. i called that matches before muhammad ali's funeral, i was privileged to cover that, what did he mean to you? i was a young black man growing up in west london. he said just to see a black man back then on the telly saying i am the greatest, you know, you have no idea what it meant was black men. actually, i'm reflecting up and cyrille was not muhammad ali, he was much more self—effacing than we found it —— muhammad ali. he was a beacon, he was the greatest, for many beacon, he was the greatest, for ma ny west beacon, he was the greatest, for many west brom fans and so many black footballers, he was the greatest and he was a great inspiration to so many people in so
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many different ways. thank you very much for coming along to talk to us. the time is half past 11 exactly. let us take the weather. the weather is getting much colder over the next few day, especially in northern parts. the rain is starting to clear, we are starting to see some brightness in yorkshire. the showers or keep moving in on the westerly winds, some of them wintry in scotland than on higher ground. there will be a mix of hail and thunder. brisk north—westerly winds, too. temperatures in the north are ready chilly, between three and five celsius. the snow showers will creep into northern parts of england and
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scotla nd into northern parts of england and scotland this evening. they could potentially be problems with snow and ice first thing tomorrow morning. the cold air will take charge of the next few days. some snow across northern parts. further south, rain. sunny spells in between, if you are lucky. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: one of britain's biggest construction firms, carillion, has been forced into liquidation after talks to tackle its debts failed. there are concerns whether the company, which employs 20,000 workers, will be able to honour its pension commitments. ukip leader henry bolton says he is no longer dating a model after it was revealed she sent racist text messages about prince harry's fiancee meghan markle. henry bolton said his relationship withjo marney, whois 25, was "incompatible" with his position. however, he has rejected calls to resign. nicola sturgeon says brexit could cut scotland's economy by more than £12 billion per year.
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scotland's first minister has accused theresa may of a "fundamental dereliction of duty" in failing to set out the economic impact of leaving the eu. now the sport. the former england striker cyrille regis has died at the age of 59. it's believed he'd suffered a heart attack. regis was best known for his time at west bromwich albion, where he's considered a legend after his 112 goals for the club. he was one of the first black players to be capped by england and was awarded an mbe in 2008. let's talk a little bit more about cyrille regis. he was a legend, and it wasn't just because cyrille regis. he was a legend, and it wasn'tjust because of his football. he was an outstanding
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player, but its influence goes well beyond the football pitch. he was a pioneer for black players, ata time he was a pioneer for black players, at a time when very few black players played at the top level. he was one of the, as they were dubbed, three black players who played under ron atkinson. at west brom there are going to put up a statue which will be unveiled later this agent season. you mentioned that he played for england. before he made his england debut he was sent ability in the post. it said he always kept it to show the evil that some people have within them and to use that as a motivation that it wouldn't stop him. he had a huge influence across football. tributes today pouring in, starting with mark bright, who said
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that he had blazed a trail for players. he heard this a lot in the m essa 9 es players. he heard this a lot in the messages being posted on social media. mark bright saying he blazed a trailfor every black media. mark bright saying he blazed a trail for every black player that followed him, an inspiration to him and many players of his era. a humble man and a great man. andy cole also giving his views this morning, saying he was devastated. poignant message, saying he is devastated this morning, his hero, his pioneer, the man who made him wa nt to his pioneer, the man who made him want to play football has passed away. alan shearer as well has posted a message saying what a man, what a centre forward. 0ne posted a message saying what a man, what a centre forward. one of my earliest memories was walking for a trial at west bromwich albion, saying cyrille regis and being in all of him. rio ferdinand paying tribute to him as well. yes, calling
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him a great man, saying he set the foundations for others. kick racism out of football have also posted a message talking about how sad and they are, using the words pioneer, iconic and talking about how he was a huge supporter in the work they do to try to tackle racism in sport. cyril regis —— cyrille regis has passed away at the age of 59. ryan giggs is set to be named as the manager of the wales national team today, succeeding chris coleman. giggs' only managerial experience so far was four games in charge of manchester united when david moyes was sacked in 2014. coleman stepped down in november, after wales failed to qualify for this year's world cup. after 30 games and 281 days, manchester city's unbeaten premier league run is finally over. they lost 4—3 to liverpool, in an incredible match at anfield. liverpool scored three goals in eight minutes, to go 4—1 up in the second half. city did fight back, but they couldn't find an equaliser.
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they are still 15 points clear at the top of the table but liverpool and their boss jurgen klopp are celebrating for the first time ever bournemouth beat arsenal — coming from behind in front of their home crowd to win 2—1 — thanks to jordan ibe, who hit his first goal for the club. britain's kyle edmund has hailed the best win of his career, beating the 11th seed kevin anderson in the first round of the australian open. he twice came from a set down and was trailing by a break in the deciding set before fighting back to reach round two in melbourne for only the second time, with a 5 set victory. he'll face denis istomin next. just overall, for personal satisfaction, the hours to put in in training, there are so many things like that. those type of results
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make it really feel good and worth it, basically, so yes, really happy. stoke city have announced that paul lambert is the new manager. he will signa 2.5 lambert is the new manager. he will sign a 2.5 year deal. some breaking news to bring you from the ministry of defence. they said that two royal air force typhoon jets had been scrambled from scotla nd jets had been scrambled from scotland to intercept russian planes near uk airspace. this does happen occasionally, but the royal air force saying that this morning to raf typhoon jets were scrambled from scotla nd raf typhoon jets were scrambled from scotland to intercept russian planes near uk airspace. we will bring you more when we get it. the construction firm carillion has gone into liquidation. government officials had been involved in talks to try to prevent the collapse of the company,
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which owes banks about £900 million. this morning, the government said public services provided by carillion will continue. the company employs 20,000 people in the uk. we can speak now to lord adonis. thank you for taking the time to talk to us. the big question that many people are asking this morning is wide of the government continue to award contracts to carillon last year when two different profit warnings were issued? and major scandal is brewing and i think the public accounts committee will want to look at this in due course. there had been profit warnings. chris grayling was given giving huge contracts grayling was given giving huge co ntra cts to grayling was given giving huge contracts to carillon after those p°p‘up contracts to carillon after those pop—up warnings. at the time people got this was a very unwise
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proceeding and it has turned out to be disastrous. what will happen is all of those contracts will need to be renegotiated and the taxpayer will pick up a bigger tab for it. these are big questions to answer. these are big questions to answer. the immediate issue today is what will happen to the services, the school meals service is, the hospitals and prisons, the service back carillon provides. it is important that the government is pragmatic about this. it is the best way to provide these services is for them to be provided by the government itself, taking on the star previously employed by carillon, it should do that. the big concern about this is that the government has such a blind spot about having public sector involvement in the services that it may just have involvement in the services that it mayjust have these contracts at huge expense to other private companies because it simply won't contemplate what is the right and pragmatic course, which is having these services provided by the states as an emergency measure.
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blind sport or an ideological opposition? -- blindspot? blindspot because of ideological opposition, i think. chris grayling did not want to contemplate the possibility that the state itself might have to step in and play a bigger role. thejob of the government is to protect the taxpayer, not to act in a partisan and ideological way and the taxpayer is going to pick up a bill run into tens of millions of pounds or possibly more as the result of the mismanagement of this corporate collapse. was any contingency planning done for the prospect of the collapse of carillon? we will see. i have to say the word on the street is that the contingency planning was pretty well nonexistent so let's wait and see what happens. at the moment we have building sites we re at the moment we have building sites were nobody is turning up, we have great uncertainty on the part of
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services that are provided i carillon and all we have at the moment is one statement by a minister who wasn't even the minister directly responsible this morning. it looks like a pretty sorry story. you are very critical of chris grayling and have been in recent months. do you think you should go? i certainly don't think he should go today. his job today about half of the state it is make sure these contracts are bidding good order and we have people turning up on building sites and construction sites and planning these hugely important infrastructure projects. i am keen that he stays in office for the immediate future because he has a job to do. his tenure as transport secretary has perhaps been the most disastrous in the history of the office and this is just the later stage of the cycle. nor did this, i cuba reports this morning. joining me now from newbury is jack hill, a carillion contractor. just explain what it is exactly that
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you do. basically, i check on the power grid that comes in the new breed to ensure there is no power cut and no damage occurs. so you won a contract from carillon to do that job. no, that company i work for won the contract from carillon. when did that happen? it was may of last year, i believe. and was there any indication at that stage that carillon's finances were looking doubtful? at that point no. there wasn't any real concern until about three months ago. what was being filtered through to you from the perspective of the company you work for? to begin with there was no real
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concern that over the weeks leading up concern that over the weeks leading up to now there is the prospect of job loss. what does this mean for the company you work for, what does it mean for you? do you have any clear picture this morning to those questions? potentially for myself that could be the prospect of the money that is to my company isn't paid that could potentially lose my job, but they are trying to avoid that as much as possible. job, but they are trying to avoid that as much as possiblelj understand from what you have been taught by your employer carillon have not paid your employer and the last couple of months, something to the tune of around £100,000? rothley, give or take, yeah. listening to the coverage of this today, it all seems unclear what will happen to the contract that
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your employer has with carillon and lots of other contracts. how quickly does your employer to find what is happening, whether he or she will be able to continue their contracts? as quickly as possible. he is doing all he can to find what is going on. we doesn't want to let anyone go, but if carillon don't pay, they don't pgy- if carillon don't pay, they don't pay. thank you for talking to us. rohingya muslims have been forced to flee violence in me and my. many have sought refuge in neighbouring bangladesh, just a few kilometres from me and mark's western border. the area around coxes bazaar has become home to of thousands of
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brushing the refugees. this boy is category red. he has a serious dip period infection. this bacterial disease blocks the airways and is often fatal if it is not treated. it is also highly contagious. it is this doctor's job to try to stop the outbreak spreading. he runs the team of outreach workers. when did hear a case comes in, their work begins. they trek through this giant refugee camp, now the biggest in the world, trying to find people who might have been exposed to the disease. the outreach workers can see up to ten cases every day, which can mean a lot of walking. so the challenge for this team is to hunt down infection and then stamp it out. the hunt begins at yasmine's home. rita and
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ripa need to take care. close contact ripa need to take care. close co nta ct ca n ripa need to take care. close contact can be dangerous even if they have had to vaccination. some members of the medical team have been infected. they explain how dangerous diphtheria can be, and give everyone in the family antibiotics. that will stop the disease developing. anyone who has been in close contact with a patient for more than an hour needs to be treated. well, listen, how dangerous is it for us, just sitting out here? it's not as dangerous for us, but it's dangerous for the rohingya community, if they were not vaccinated when they arrived. so what is happening now? are you getting this disease under control? we hope that we can control it through vaccination, with preventative medicine, as well as with treating the cases. the signs are that this disease,
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long forgotten in countries where vaccination is commonplace, is now being brought under control. but the hunt continues. with more than 800,000 people packed together in these vast refugee camps, the team can't take any chances. part of a mezzanine floor inside the stock exchange in the indonesian capital, jakarta, has collapsed. at least 72 people have been hurt and are being treated in three different hospitals in jakarta. police say the collapse was due to an accident, not an explosion. the stock exchange, based inside a multi—storey building in centraljakarta, has re—opened for the afternoon session. 0ur correspondent rebecca henshke is on the scene. she sent us this update. it was lunchtime when the roof of
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this walkway area that is behind the collapse. we understand that there we re collapse. we understand that there were people waiting in the kind of lobby area of the stock exchange here in centraljakarta, including some university students, we are told, he had come to visit the stock exchange today. the area has been sealed off. this is as close as we can get at the moment. rescue workers have gone inside the area to look carefully through the rubble to make sure no one else has been caught or is trapped inside. they believe that most people who were injured when the roof collapsed have now been taken to hospital. the police spokesperson telling us a few minutes ago that around 15 ambulances have left the scene but those injured. the stock exchange we understand has reopened and just a few minutes ago workers who were told to evacuate these buildings,
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all workers in all the stories of these two towers, including world bank employees, had to leave. they have not been told they can enter through tower one over here. a few people being able to return to work as long as they stay away from the area back collapsed. this is a new building in the heart ofjakarta. 0nly building in the heart ofjakarta. only a few years old. it is the heart of indonesia's capital, jakarta. its economic heart here. there will be many questions asked in the coming days how this could happen. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour, but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the construction firm carillion says it is entering compulsory liquidation after talks to tackle its debts failed. the leader of ukip says he is no longer dating a model who was revealed to have sent racist texts about prince harry's fiancee, meghan markle. a study by scottish government
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officials is warning that a hard brexit could cut scotland's economy by more than twelve billion pounds per year. in the business news: as we've heard, one of britain's biggest construction companies, and a major government contractor, has gone into liquidation, threatening thousands of jobs. but workers are told to turn up to work as normal and pensioners in the company's scheme have been told their benefits will be protected. plane maker airbus says it will halt production of its a380 super—jumbos unless it has another orderfrom emirates. the dubai—based airline has been the main customerfor the plane, but has cut back on its orders in recent years. demand has been growing for smaller, more lightweight planes that can land anywhere rather than the bulky, double decker planes that have to use specific airports and runways. virgin trains is reversing its decision to ban sales of the daily mail on its west coast services. sir richard branson said
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he and sir brian souter, who is a part—owner of the company, had asked managers to reconsider, saying that tolerance for differing views were the core principles of a free society. more now of the woes for staff at the building giant carillion. current staff working on public sector jobs have been told to work as normal and that they will be paid. and some reassurance for pensioners with funds in the carillion pension scheme — it has a near £600 million black hole, but will be rescued by the pension protection fund. tom mcphail, head of pensions policy, hargreaves lansdownjoins me now. i want to be really clear about this because there will be a lot of people are understandably worried about what happens, either they work for carillon or have a penchant there. let's talk about the pension blackall. some reassurance for
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people? there is this deficit of nearly £600 million from various carillon pension schemes, quite a number of schemes across different employers. there is this deficit there. to put it in perspective, the pension protection fund, the lifeboat scheme that back schemes when they get into these situations, has a current surplus of £6 billion, so substantially greater funds available within the lifeboat scheme. if that carillon scheme does now passed across to the pension protection fund there are assets they are to make sure that all members will get the bulk of the pensions they are promised. there will be different treatment between those who are retired and those not yet at retirement, but there is a prolific money there to meet those liabilities. it will differ. if you are not currently drying your pension you won't get as much as may be people who currently are? that's right. if you haven't reached normal
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retirement age you are likely to see a 10% cut to your promised pension. you will also then possibly see some reductions to the inflation proofing you will enjoy intervention in retirement. that will slowly erode the value of the pension to what you would of got. if you are a high earner, a substantial pension promised, there is a cap of £34,000 that and you might see some of the higher value of your pension reduced. there is a mitigating measure the mint if you have long service that level can be raised again. today is a horrible day for anyone who has a subcontractor or worker at carillon, but this is exactly the sort of thing that the pension protection fund is setup for, isn't it? absolutely. it is a tried and tested model. they have taken a number of schemes into assessment. they have paid the benefits on the schemes. they know
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what they are doing. assuming that the scheme do not pass across to them, they will work with the administrators of that scheme, work but the liquidators, sure the there is continuity of pension payments. their pensions will start being paid, be at domain that be a modest reduction in the those people not yet having reached retirement. tom, thank you for your time. in other business news, male working patterns have seen a big shift towards part—time roles a study has found. almost one in eight men work part—time today, compared with fewer than one in 12 two decades ago, according to the resolution foundation think—tank. it says more men in low paid roles are working fewer hours or part time, while higher paid men work more. sales of volkswagen cars rose to a new record last year thanks to rising demand in china and the americas. despite the emission cheating scandal, the company overtook toyota
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as the world's best—selling carmaker in 2017. it's on track to retain that spot. a mining company operating in the southern african kingdom of lesotho says it's dug up the fifth largest diamond ever discovered. the company, gem diamonds, says the stone weighs 910 carats, which is about the size of two golf balls. the stone could be worth more than $40 million due to its very high quality. shares in carillion suspended, but elsewhere shares in building firms on the up. such is the nature of capitalism, they're in line for new contracts if carillion is broken up and sold off. speedy hire, that rents cranes, diggers and the like, one of carillion's largest suppliers. that's all the business news. a driver and passenger in california
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have had a lucky escape after their car ended up have had a lucky escape after their carended up in have had a lucky escape after their car ended up in into an office building. but the driver and passenger miraculously received only minor injuries. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment, we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two, first, we leave you with for a look at the weather. the weather is coming colder over the coming days and rather u nsettled. the coming days and rather unsettled. we have some snow in the forecast and it has been a wet morning. the weather front is starting to clear, so ready we have seen some starting to clear, so ready we have seen some brightness. the weather front is clearing south and eastwards. i that we are into an north—westerly flow of much colder air, brisk winds beading in a series
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of showers. some of those showers could be wintry, especially on higher ground in scotland this afternoon. further south bolling has reigned. the brisk winds will continue through the rest of the day. billing mile for the time of year a cross day. billing mile for the time of year across southern part of the british isles, but still pretty chilly further north. the colder air will move into most areas overnight. three orfour will move into most areas overnight. three or four celsius to high will move into most areas overnight. three orfour celsius to high in will move into most areas overnight. three or four celsius to high in the north, ten in the site. into late afternoon, the snow showers continue across scotland, perhaps even getting to lower levels. into england and wales, a few showers dotted about stop some brisk winds as well just taking dotted about stop some brisk winds as welljust taking the edge of the temperatures. highs of 10 celsius in london, but it won't feel like it in the air. nine celsius for devon and cornwall. brisk winds across wales. into tonight, the potentialfor some icy stretches, especially in
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northern ireland and scotland, so ta ke northern ireland and scotland, so take care through tonight and first thing tomorrow morning. the snow showers feeding into northern parts of england and northern ireland, maybe even at lower levels. the colder air taken charge of the weather over the next few days and you will see you head out tomorrow. the first thing tomorrow morning, yes we have the snow showers across scotland, northern ireland and northern parts of england even at lower levels, but further south bolling has reigned. in between there will be some brighter interludes if you are lucky, but we still have the wind, so it will be like minus five celsius in some places, so wrapped up warm. as we head towards weddings the empire state, we will see some stormy conditions, so keep in touch with the weather forecast. there will be some brighter interludes between the showers and hopefully things will start to settle down again as we head towards the end of the week. that is your latest forecast.
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government this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 12: the future of 20,000 workers in doubt following the collapse of one of britain's biggest construction firms, carillion. it's a matter of great regret that this liquidation has taken place. but the government's priority, rightly, has been to ensure protection for key public services. this company issued three profit warnings in the last six months, yet despite those profit warnings, the government still continued to grant contracts to this company. the leader of ukip says he's no longer dating a model who sent racist texts about prince harry's fiancee, meghan markle. the cost of a hard brexit for scotland's economy — a warning it could be more than £12 billion a year. the uk is to give £2 million towards the cost of vaccinating rohingya muslim children in bangladesh against diphtheria. also cyrille regis — a pioneer for black footballers —
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dies at the age of 59. ‘s jewellery just taking it well on the chest. what a great shot. -- cyrille regis. tributes are paid to the former west brom striker, who made his name in the late 1970s. and a miraculous escape for a driver and passenger — how they only ended up with minor injuries from this car crash in the us. good afternoon. it's monday 15th january. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the construction firm, carillion, has gone into liquidation. government officials had been involved in talks to try to prevent
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the collapse of the company, which owes banks about £900 million. this morning the prime minister said the priority was the continuation of public services. the company employs 20,000 people in the uk. carillion hold approximately 450 contracts with the government. some of the projects include the new hs2 rail line and managing nearly 900 school buildings across the country. they are the second largest supplier of maintenance services to network rail and operate £200 million worth of prison contracts, as well as providing cleaning and catering in hospitals. speaking this morning, the cabinet secretary david lidington reassured workers on public sector contracts they will continue to receive their wages. it's a matter of great regret that this liquidation has taken place but the government's priority, rightly, has been to ensure protection for key public services. so, that's why we have signed up with the supported
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administration today through the official receiver because that means that administration will be conducted in an orderly fashion. we as government will continue to pay the wages and salaries of employees working on those public sector contracts. they can come into work today knowing that that is the position and they will, we'll be paying their salaries today through the official receiver, not through carillion into a different bank account, but that money has always been in our budget. the labour shadow business secretary rebecca long bailey described the news of the liquidation as a worrying development. she called for a full investigation and she had significant concerns. we're also asking for a full investigation into the government's conduct of this matter. this company issued three profit warnings in the last six months, yet despite those profit warnings, the government still continue to grant contracts to this company.
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now this completely contrevened government policy, their strategic management of risks, they were entitled to deem this company as high risk if profit warnings were issued, they didn't do this. they should've ensured that a crown official was appointed to deal with the company and mitigate any potential losses that might have occurred. with me now is our business correspondent ben thompson. the stalkers do how carillion got into this situation in the first place. analysts will say it is simple, it got too big too quickly. the debts mounting and it is a position where you cannot pay back what it owes. we should point out that carillion, they are a company that many people have not really heard of, that explains most of its activities, a clea n explains most of its activities, a clean hospitals and building hospitals, roads, railways, runs prisons, provide school lunches. it
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also operates as the world, particularly in canada, but part of the middle east and north africa. it grew too quickly some say, a break too heavily, spiralling coasts on some major projects. costs that go higher and higher. debts of £1.5 billion. real question is now emerging about why carillion was given the contract is up until the end of last year, even though it had issued a number of profit warnings and so that is properly a question for the government to answer but a lot of concerned that very vital public services were still being handed to carillion even know it had made it clear it was in financial trouble. lots of questions now about the exposure of these public services, of other sons who were jointly liable with carillion says some contracts, the supplies et. what can you tell us about how these contracts which it handled good to be handled the future? it is still early days. it shows how
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complicated the web is of how these contracts are awarded, who carried them out, a lot of subcontractors who are working so carillion who are not actually part of the main company. you are right, a lot of the construction firms have had joint ventures to build big projects. the talk about construction projects, hs2, maintaining 50,000 homes for the ministry of defence, 900 school buildings, also £200 billion worth of contracts. to separate these very roughly, we will look at the private sector and the public sector, public roads and railways and schools. we are told the governor will make sure they still happen. they have told any they still happen. they have told a ny staff they still happen. they have told any staff who are working in the public service, on public budgets figure in to turn up for work, you will be paid. the big questions either the private sector, with subcontractors, if we are not good to get paid, will not turn up on the site. many suggesting they are taking their facilities away.
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diggers, all those sort of things that are on site, they want sure they are not all caught up in this because ultimately, normally we talk about firms going into administration, that is when a ccou nta nts administration, that is when accountants come in and try to get the company back on an even keel and sell it off as a going concern. what we are talking about here is very different, it is liquidation. they have said this business cannot continue, we are going to look for what can be sold off and then the firm will end. they are looking for what part of this business is our bible to sell off elsewhere. —— is valuable. thank you. earlier i spoke to peter plisner, our midlands business correspondent who was outside the carillion headquarters. the reaction has been sadness and dismay and surprise, until this morning i think most people were fairly convinced there may be some kind of deal reached that at least would give the company a stay of execution for the next three months. that was not to be. today, we have seen that was not to be. today, we have seen what is going on in a sombre mood, no one wanting to comment to
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the media. i have seen what i think are administration receivers going m, are administration receivers going in, they are clearly taking up work already. certainly one of the big things is, as ben was saying, the small contractors who work so carillion, what happens to them, some of them are owed money. it is unlikely, i think, some of them are owed money. it is unlikely, ithink, that some of them are owed money. it is unlikely, i think, that they will get any of that back. the head of commerce has said that the real immediate things that need to happen reassurance for those small contractors. he's a thorough contractors. he's a thorough contractors all over the countries you woke up this morning and now they are not sure whether they have worked at the end of the week. certainly not good for those smaller firms. some of those private contracts that carillion was doing, one of those is the centre of birmingham where a massive regeneration project is taking place. i regeneration project is taking place. lam regeneration project is taking place. i am told that that scheme is about 80% complete and the private firm that is building it will bring in another contractor to complete
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the work, i guess. a different story at another project just a few miles away, new super hospital being built on the edge of the black country, that was being funded by carillion and they got their money back by charging a mortgage over the next 30 years or so. charging a mortgage over the next 30 years or so. still do not really know what is happening with our project but i guess that is one of the projects that will be supported by the government, in fact i know from a statement from the nhs trusts dealing with that hospital. they said they are working closely with the treasury and the hospital company that is building a as you are tonnes of arrangements to put in place, they say people working with carillion are part of our local community and we will do everything we can to support them. i also spoke to tim roache from the gmb union who said those contracts in the public sector should be brought back in house. we are talking here about public sector contracts, contracts to clean hospitals, context is clean schools and caterfor hospitals, context is clean schools and cater for schoolchildren. prisons, these are contracts that
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have been put up into the private sector. the problem with private sector companies taking on public sector companies taking on public sector contracts is that these private companies are looking for profit first rather than making sure that the services, the contracts are delivered. what we are saying as a result of this debacle, i had the government minister says it is with great regret, it certainly is, the tens of thousands of people that might represent, talk about a blow monday, it really is. —— blue monday. the taxpayer would be taking on the risk. as many, many public sector context down the uk are public sector context down the uk a re invested public sector context down the uk are invested in house by authorities, that is exactly what should have happened but these contracts. instead they've been put out to tender, carillion by the admission of the person you interviewed, has overstretch itself, what that has led to is a race to the bottom on employers and workers terms and conditions and it has gone bang. the other thing i need they've become anything they've been
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watching this closely. they clearly have not. they have been asleep at the wheel. there have been three profit warnings back injuly and yet they still have awarded more contracts. the government says is going to stand behind the wages of public service employees. you must be pleased to hear that been stated clearly. do you have any idea how long that it is for? is that not be part? of course i'm delighted i have a number of gmb members who are very anxious, contacted me, saying do i turn off were? we have said yes, course you do. —— do i turn up for work. we welcome the response that thejobs will be work. we welcome the response that the jobs will be safeguarded four now. how long would that last? what happens with the contractors as well? first of all, there must be a com plete well? first of all, there must be a complete and immediate moratorium on any contracts being awarded externally and secondly, when this has all been settled, we need to have a proper independent, open, transparent enquiry on to hell on earth this happen and how it can never happen again. tim roache, from the gmb.
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the ukip leader henry bolton says he's has split from his girlfriend over racist and offensive comments she made about prince harry's fiancee meghan markle. mr bolton said his relationship withjo marney, was "incompatible" with his position. mr bolton now faces calls for his resignation, suzanne evans former leader of ukip and brexit campaigner. shejoins us from our studio in shropshire. thank you for your time today. he was asked to choose between the party, hisjob was asked to choose between the party, his job and was asked to choose between the party, hisjob and his girlfriend. he chose hisjob. if it enough party, hisjob and his girlfriend. he chose his job. if it enough to keep him in post, in your opinion? u nfortu nately, keep him in post, in your opinion? unfortunately, i do not think it is. there are many people, most people in uk buyers speak to are certainly very angry and upset about what henry has done an about what has happened. it seems we have somebody here who has apparently dumped his wife this girl and now he has done this girl for hisjob. i think the trouble is it is all very embarrassing and very seedy. there
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we re embarrassing and very seedy. there were calls of course for his resignation before jo were calls of course for his resignation beforejo marney‘s disgraceful text actually came to light. the fact that he has ditched her after those taxes one thing, but i'm afraid it does not really get rid of the problem that we had before that, but he seems to have showed incredible misjudgement and actually starting this relationship in the first place. he says that his former girlfriend's comments were indefensible but there was some context to them. many people have asked how can there be context if they are utterly indefensible. do you have any idea what he's talking about when he talks about the contacts?” what he's talking about when he talks about the contacts? i have no idea. i have asked this same question myself. i cannot conceive of any circumstance when you might makejokes along of any circumstance when you might make jokes along those lines. i find absolutely battling. to be fair, i am pleased that ukip acted very quickly. as soon as they came to light, jo marney was immediately suspended, perhaps some other
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parties could take a leaf out of ukip's book on that one, we acted very quickly and suspended her from the party and i'm sure there will be a full disciplinary hearing. that is good news. ithink a full disciplinary hearing. that is good news. i think henry's position is untenable now. it is not going to go away. if they're not a wider point here, you could ever have a series of leaders all with very short ten years, the party seems to be riven with infighting and now that the referendum is over and brexit has been voted for, it does not really seem to have a rationale to continue. we closer to the end of ukip?|j think brexit has not happened yet, there are moves afoot to try and prevent it happening at all. no, there is still a place ukip in british politics. i think this is why it is so upsetting and why so many ukip members are so angry that henry has got the party into this
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situation really because ukip is needed more than ever, we need to did snapping at the heels of government to make sure we get it clea n government to make sure we get it clean brexit and notjust a brexit in name only, that we actually do properly get out of the european union and take back control as the people at the heels of government to make sure we get it clean brexit and not just a brexit make sure we get it clean brexit and notjust a brexit in name only, that we actually do properly get out of the european union and take back control as the people of this country were promised during the eu referendum and as they voted for. there is an easy ukip more than ever. i am afraid just say, yes, we have been unfortunate enough choice of leaders over the past couple of yea rs. of leaders over the past couple of years. just say that has been a problem not mean that we should stick with the lame duck leader. thank you very much. the headlines on bbc newsroom live the construction firm the construction firm carillion says it is entering compulsory liquidation after talks to tackle its debts failed. 20,000 jobs are at risk. the leader of ukip says he's no longer dating a model who was revealed to have sent racist texts about prince harry's fiancee, meghan markle.
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a study by scottish government officials is warning that a hard brexit could cut scotland's economy by more than £12 billion per year. it is time for spot. hello, good afternoon. west bromwich albion say they are deeply saddened and shocked by the death of cyrille regis, the former england striker has died at the age of 59. he was best known for his time at the hawthorns, scoring 112 goals for the club. he was one of the first black players to be capped by england and was awarded an mbe in 2008. another format and you striker was among those, devastated this morning... alan shearer said... and anotherformer
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and another former england captain rio ferdinand said... ryan giggs is set to be named as the new manager of wales. his only manage yourfriends new manager of wales. his only manage your friends so far with four games in charge of manchester united when david moyes was sacked back in 2014. comment step down in november after wales failed to qualify for this year while cup. paul lambert is the new manager of stoke city. he sang 2.5 year contract and replaces marcuse who was sacked just over a week ago. lambert has been out of work since leaving walls at the end of last season. hejoins us leaving walls at the end of last season. he joins us to examine who are 18th in the premier league table, a point away from safety. britain's karl eichmann has held the best win of his career, beating the 11th seed kevin anderson in the australian open. he twice came from a set banner was trailing by a break
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in the deciding set before fighting back to reach round to in melbourne for only the second time with a five set victory. he will face dennis next. just overall, personal satisfaction, the hours you put in, the training, so the hours you put in, the training, so many things like that. those types of results just make it really, really feel good and worth it, basically. iam it, basically. i am really happy. there are a couple of surprises in the women's drawer, venus williams has been knocked out, beaten in straight debts by belinda. williams lost in the final last year to her sister serena. the us open champion, she has also been knocked out. that is all the sports amount. i will have a full round—up of around 130. i will see you then. thank you. the uk has said it will provide £2 million towards the cost of vaccinating more than a third of a million rohingya muslim children against
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diphtheria in bangladesh. many have sought refuge in neighbouring bangladesh, just a few kilometres from myanmar‘s western border. the vaccination campaign is key to controlling a major outbreak around cox's bazaar which has become home to hundreds of thousands of rohingya refugees. the bbc‘s mishal husain is at what is now the world's largest refugee camp, at kutupalong in cox's bazaar. given the sense of what it is like there, the efforts to provide the basic necessities to the people living there. you only have to look around, i am absolutely surrounded in almost every direction by these small bamboo huts which were just instructed in a matter of days by the refugees when they first came across the border from the refugees when they first came across the borderfrom me the refugees when they first came across the border from me and the refugees when they first came across the borderfrom me and my. whatever materials there were the hand, there are bound to polls given
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out. they work with those. you only have to look around at the scene here to understand how difficult life is for them and how real the threat of diseases like diphtheria and others is because people are living in very cramped conditions. large families who are all crammed into a small space inside one of the huts. the risk of infection spreading is very high. that is why the uk government has pledged £2 million towards diphtheria vaccination programme and it is also had a british medical team head the urban working to try and contain the outbreak of the disease that is orally been reported. they set up diphtheria clinics from scratch and when each patient there is treated, they have to try and identify eve ryo ne they have to try and identify everyone who has come into proximity with that patient, to try and stop the disease spreading. it is a very big challenge to combat the threat of disease here and i'll sell asian correspondent has been looking into
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that. —— south asian correspondent. yassim is category red. he has a serious diphtheria infection. this bacterial disease blocks the airways, and is often fatal if it isn't treated. it is also highly contagious. it is dr haldar‘s job to try and stop the outbreak spreading. he runs a team of outreach workers. when a diphtheria case comes in, their work begins. they trek through this giant refugee camp, now the biggest in the world, trying to find people who might have been exposed to the disease. the outreach workers can see up to ten cases every day, which can mean a lot of walking. so the challenge for this team is to hunt down infection, and then stamp it out. the hunt begins at yassim's home. rita and repa need to take care.
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close contact can be dangerous, even if you have had the vaccination. some members of the medical team have been infected. they explain how dangerous diphtheria can be, and give everyone in the family antibiotics. that will stop the disease developing. anyone who has been in close contact with a patient for more than an hour needs to be treated. well, listen, how dangerous is it for us, just sitting out here? it's not as dangerous for us, but it's dangerous for the rohingya community, if they were not vaccinated when they arrived. so what is happening now? are you getting this disease under control? we hope that we can control it through vaccination, with preventative medicine, as well as with treating the cases. the signs are that this disease, long forgotten in countries where vaccination is commonplace,
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is now being brought under control. but the hunt continues. with more than 800,000 people packed together in these vast refugee camps, the team can't take any chances. chronic malnutrition which is seen in some cases. in almost every aspect of life that you look at here, there are considerable problems, shelter is not sturdy and afterwards done the cyclist, the monfils that would evidently come in a few months' time. —— cyclones and monsoons. basic rations are given out to the refugees and there is a political problem because there are talks today between the government of myanmar and bangladesh of
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potentially starting the process of sending the refugees home. the latest rohingya to arrive here are giving accounts of the violence they have suffered just in the last couple of weeks. it is very difficult, very challenging for eve ryo ne difficult, very challenging for everyone concerned whichever way you look at it. thank you very much. more details have been revealed about the westminster bridge attack at a pre—inquest hearing. five people were killed after a car and knife attack close to the houses of parliament last march. the attacker, 52—year—old khalid masood, was shot dead by police. daniel is at the old bailey. bring us daniel is at the old bailey. bring us date with what those details that have been revealed. this is a pre—inquest review that was happening today for the inquest in two the victims of the people killed on westminster bridge and pct
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palmer who with the police officer who was stabbed to death. —— keith palmer. and khalid masood, the armed attacker, who was shot dead by police. they will be heard by the chief coroner, he said today in his introduction that the lives of many we re introduction that the lives of many were torn apart in less than two minutes of high drama. he decided today that in all likelihood that he will hear is essentially to inquest, first of all, an increase in to the victims, the five victims of khalid masood, that will be held without a jury. separately, an inquest into the death of khalid masood which will be held with a jury. they are being held separately parlayed because of the request of the families and looking at different issues. we did learn some new details about the events of march 22 last year this morning, in particular we have heard that khalid masood, the attacker, had in his
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you're in, which was examined after he had been killed, levels of steroids, it was suggested he had taken steroids in the hours or days before he carried out that attack. we also got an idea of some of the issues that are likely to be lies everything close. firstly, to firearm officers who confronted khalid masood are going to be granted anonymity. both are members of the royalty and specialist protection command and they are being, having their identity preserved so they can continue to do theirjobs properly. also we had from counsel for four of the families of those who died, he made it clear how angry the families were with the internet companies who had allowed radical material to stay on my long after it should've been taken down and who were very concerned about end to end encryption. he said we do not understand why it is necessary for
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whatsapp and telegram to have entered went encryption. we also heard how pc keith palmer's family does really want to know what body armour he was wearing because they still to this day have not been told what type of body army dott, he was wearing on that day. you can see what issues are going to come up when the inquest begins on the 10th of september this year. daniel, thank you very much. scottish first minister nicola sturgeon has called on the uk government to drop its red lines on brexit, after a new study published by scottish government officials warned that a hard brexit, meaning no trade deal with the eu, would cost the country's economy almost £13 billion a year. earlier i spoke to our scotland correspondent lorna gordon, and began by asking her to explain the main findings of the report. new year, reboot on the argument of brexit. a different location, normally she would be holding this
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at the residence, bute house, it is undergoing repairs at the moment. instead it was held in the building behind me, at edinburgh university. she takes us through the three scenarios, potential scenarios of the uk leaving the eu, nicola sturgeon, saying this analysis fire more detailed than anything provided so more detailed than anything provided so far by the uk government. the three scenarios she goes into art of course the uk staying in the single market, preferential free course the uk staying in the single market, preferentialfree trade canada market, preferentialfree trade ca na da style market, preferentialfree trade canada style agreement and a so—called hard brexit underworld trade organisation rules. let me very clear this analysis shows that none of these options are as good as staying in eu. our economy will take a hit under all of them. however least damaging option by far is staying in the single market.
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of course these are just projections but they are pretty detailed. this analysis suggested that staying in this single market would cost every single person here in scotland £700, free trade agreement will cost every person in scotland £1600, while no deal at all would cost every single person £2300 by the year 2030. interestingly, nicola sturgeon also talks about being in favour very strongly in favour of the free movement of people. she says that is absolutely essential for scotland going forward. she calls this the greatest national challenge and she says it is her duty to make the case the free movement because all projected population scenarios for scotla nd projected population scenarios for scotland say that without migration, the population of scotland would drop. she says this is a moment for
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moderate voices, as she sees it, to come together to argue the case that the single market. she sees this as a very small window of opportunity. she is calling in particular the jeremy corbyn and labour to join her in calls to remain in the single market. he appears to have rejected that. the uk government has orally responded. they say they are seeking a brexit deal that works for the united kingdom. —— already responded. breaking news. the founder of momentum john mannesmann has been elected to labour's national executive committee. all three on supported by the ce ntre—left all three on supported by the centre—left grassroots alliance which includes momentum. they are occupying new positions on the ndc which has been expanded from 36 to 39 members. —— nec. area
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are a sole addition ofjeremy corbyn's power on the nec, and it will worry as certain section of the party. it is a significant development. it is probably the first time in labour's history that the hard left has secured control of the hard left has secured control of the national executive committee. previously, the party leadership have always been able to rely on trade unions to basically support them and defeat the left. with the election of three momentum supporters, jeremy corbyn and momentum have a majority. that underlines the extent to which jeremy corbyn has put much complete control of his party, notjust in terms of the party membership, but in terms of the nec, too. they are the body that will change the rule
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changes in the future about how you elect a leader or the process of reselection. it is a fundamental win, if you like, forjeremy corbyn and momentum. labour is trying to keep up the pressure following the demise of carillon, demanding this morning that all those employed by carillon should be taken on the state's hoax. the liberal democrats are calling for an enquiry into the government's handling of carillon contracts. vince cable joins government's handling of carillon contracts. vince cablejoins me now. there is a specific issue around the contracts that have been awarded since profit warnings were issued. this seemed like a high risk, dangerous thing but the government to have done. they claimed they cove red to have done. they claimed they covered their risks, but let's find out about is the case. are we the outer limits of how far of the private sector should run public
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services? carillon and load had something like or hundred and 50 different public sector contracts. we are reaching the outer limits. the model at the moment is that when projects are well the private sector makes big profits, when they feel they gloat off—load that debt to the government. that isn't right. the government. that isn't right. the government does not have the facility to do these things. one of the models they ought to be looking at is how to farm out more of this to medium—size companies rather than concentrating it in a handful of large but vulnerable companies. how far has a culture been allowed to develop and whitehall where civil serva nts blu ntly get develop and whitehall where civil servants bluntly get too close to an too cosy with some of these mega— private sector companies and almost routinely hand the lucrative contracts routinely hand the lucrative co ntra cts to routinely hand the lucrative contracts to them? i'm not implying
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it is corrupt, but there is a dangerous overconce ntration it is corrupt, but there is a dangerous overconcentration on some of our industries and listed building up the scrawny relationship. 0ne building up the scrawny relationship. one of the lessons the public will draw from this episode is whether rewards have been allocated, the chief executive led this company into this has walked away with millions. hedge fund are making millions gambling against the government. many individuals and small companies will go bust in tragic circumstances. how far will the taxpayer end up footing bill? david livingstone this morning seemed to be playing down the idea that the taxpayer would end up footing a hefty bill? if there is an orderly process of taking these contracts in—house and re—tendering them, significant losses could be
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avoided. the government has taken on the pension fund, which has about adam £800 million deficit. the pensioners will take a hit. the government is now taking this on. there will be other losses along the way. in broad terms will be nice and move against the remorseless contracting out of public services to the private sector? the one good thing that has come out of this is the principle that you can companies that are too big to fail. that will force a rethinking about how tendering his done high to spread the risk more effectively to bring more expertise into government. in some cases government running the contracts themselves. i hope this is a wake—up call to get public services managed in a much more efficient way that takes proper account of taxpayer interest. we
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will get more of this in the house of commons this afternoon at about 3:30pm when david livingstone will be making a statement on the carillon affair. much more on the programme about carillon. danny shaw is here to talk about how the news will affect the prison contracts held by carillion. carillon has two contracts with the military of justice carillon has two contracts with the military ofjustice —— ministry of justice, to maintain and repair 50 prisons. those 50 prisons are in london, south england and south—west england and the east event and they include jail such england and the east event and they includejail such as include jail such as belmarsh prison, pentonville, wandsworth,
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wormwood scrubs. some big prisons are included in that contract. the type of work that people who work for carillon two is clearing blocked to i lets, for carillon two is clearing blocked toilets, mending broken windows, sorting out central heating problems. it is the routine maintenance and repairs that are very important to the running of prisons. they have had that contact sincejune prisons. they have had that contact since june 2,00015. prisons. they have had that contact sincejune 2,00015. back contract was signed by chris grayling when was signed by chris grayling when was the justice was thejustice secretary in 2014. it is about halfway through and i think the government has already paid carillon about £100 million. what will happen to those contracts now? who will carry out the work? at the moment we are told it is business as usual. staff are going to work and they are being paid by the government through the official receiver. looking ahead, it looks like plans are well underway to try to bring that contract in—house so
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it would essentially fault of the responsibility of the prison service, which is what happened before carillon took over those contracts. is that something that you think would be welcomed?” contracts. is that something that you think would be welcomed? i think it would because the performance of carillon has been not good over the last couple of years. reports say that windows on getting fixed, the cells are not being kept up to scratch. earlier i spoke to jack hill, a carillion contractorfrom newbury, the company he works for were awarded a contract by carillion in may last yearand i asked him whether there was any concern about carillion at that time. at that point, no. there wasn't any real concern until about three months ago. and what was being filtered through to you about that from the perspective of the company you work for? to begin with, there
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was no real concern but obviously over the period of weeks leading up to what it is now the operator, there is the prospect ofjob loss. what does this mean for the company you work for, what does it mean for you? do you have any clear picture this morning or any care and service to those questions? potentially, for myself, there could be the prospect if the money that is owed to my company is unpaid, i could potentially lose my job. company is unpaid, i could potentially lose myjob. but, obviously, they are trying to avoid that as much as possible. obviously, they are trying to avoid that as much as possiblelj understand from the chat you have with our producer that what you have been told from your employer, carillon have not plagiarism ploy in the last couple of months, something to the tune of £100,000. that is what you have been told. roughly, give take, yeah. listening to the coverage of this today, it all seems unclear what is going to happen to
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the contract that your employer has with carillon and to lots of other gg ‘employer employer???» or ~ ~ , employer???» orshe ~ ~ , as £5515 zf’ 11,5?” 7' 7 w 7” as gigs. fl; is 3771757777 77 7 7777 777 as quickly as possible. he is doing all we can find what is going on and he's trying to look at us as best he can. he doesn't want to let anybody go but, at the end of the day, if carillon don't pay, they don't pay. one aspect of the collapse is how the pensions of the workers will be affected. to talk about that is steve webb, director of policy at royal london. a lot of people hearing this news this morning will have got straightaway about their pensions. take us through that. there is some reassurance, when a company goes to the wall nowadays, there is a lifeboat scheme called the pension protection fund. all the money in the pension protection fund... if
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you are ready at pension age you will get you a full pension, if you're coming up to pension age you will get 90%. the annual increases will get 90%. the annual increases will be smaller because you're in this new scheme. you will lose all your pension, or most of it, but you would rather not be in this position in the first place. but those yet to retire who will receive 90% of their pensions, is there any chance of them recuperating that extra 10% at any point? there isn't, really. u nless any point? there isn't, really. unless a huge amount of money was found when carillon is one. to. but that pension fund, that will not happen. the banks tend to be at the front of the queue, not the pension funds. the only caveat on that is carillon is a complicated business. there are 14 different pension schemes and each one of them will have a different experience. in
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general, the workers will get less pension. in the carillon yearly report, they say that the dividend had increased every year, but there is also a pension fund deficit of half £1 billion. that raises big questions in general about big business and how they build company profits at the results will pension fund deficit. will any of those funds end up that deficit or is that not going to happen? when a firm makes a property can either reinvested in the business, pay about in dividends or put money in the pension fund. i think this is a worrying aspect of the carillon case. the prided themselves on increasing the dividends, but there was a hole of half £1 billion in the pension fund. that balance was wrong and regulators should have been saying if you can't afford to pay out tens of millions in dividends, more that should have gone to the
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pension fund. big questions for the regulators are big questions for government. absolutely. a woman has gone on trial in the south of france, accused of seducing and poisoning four elderly men. two of the men died as a result. patricia dagorn, who's been dubbed the ‘black widow of the riviera' denies the charges. let's talk to hugh schofield, who is in paris. this woman, 57 years old, temp three, he is in prison already for an attack on an elderly man back in 2012 it was after that incident that the police got interested in her and started looking into her past. it turned out that in the previous couple of years on the cote d'azur she had befriended and off a lot of men through a dating agency. she
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advertised for men above a certain age, in their 60s and 70s. according to the prosecution her modus operandi was the same. she would befriend them, they were often widowers. they were delighted by her company and care, but then they would start feeling peculiar. according to the prosecution she was delivering to them at cocktail of valium, alcohol, other drugs and getting them while they were in a daze the makeover money, checks, even changed their wills. according to the prosecution there are several men who fell into this category. two of them they save died as a result of them they save died as a result of this. one back in 2011, she was there at the time, no one thought anything was wrong to they thought itan anything was wrong to they thought it an accidental death. roger was incarcerated on this other bed they made the link and true connection with load of other men. she is on
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trial this week for those two alleged murders and two other poisoning cases and that she is found guilty she could be sent to prison for life. thank you. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the construction firm carillion says it is entering compulsory liquidation after talks to tackle its debts failed. the leader of ukip says he is no longer dating a model who was revealed to have sent racist texts about prince harry's fiancee, meghan markle. a study by scottish government officials is warning that a hard brexit could cut scotland's economy by more than £12 billion per year. a leading charity is claiming thousands of parents in england are struggling to pay nursery fees, because of problems accessing a government website. the pre—school learning alliance says glitches on the hmrc site mean some parents are missing out on their right to 30 hours free childcare or tax breaks. but the government says fewer than two per cent of parents who have opened accounts had encountered problems.
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we are joined now by graham whitham, head of policy and external relations at the national day nursery association. thanks for coming on to talk to us. as far as you are concerned, how big of these problems with the it on this system? there are major problems of the childcare choices website, beside that the parents have to use to register for tax—free childcare. scores of parents have been having problems with this site. it was the set with real problems when it launched in september and those problems are ongoing. some pa rents a re those problems are ongoing. some parents are getting their allergens but —— eligibility code so they can claim that they are in title too. it has caused a lot of stress for pa rents has caused a lot of stress for parents and bursaries. it is a major problem for nurseries and parents up
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and down the country. the national days nursery association we are being contacted daily by our members who are telling us that they and pa rents who are telling us that they and parents that they support are having problems with this site. you have been saying that some parents on relying —— are relying on the goodwill of nurseries to look after their children pending the arrival of this money. that's right. this is ata time of this money. that's right. this is at a time when there at around toronto huge financial pressure. and nursery contacted —— a nursery contacted at this morning to said they had to take on extra staffjust to look after this administrative problem. nurseries can continue to provide care for everfor problem. nurseries can continue to provide care for ever for children without being paid. it will be an issue for nurseries in terms of accessing the funding they need but there are still problems with this website. it is often down to the
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nursery working with parents to try to get around these issues. nurseries at the moment are under huge financial pressure and it is difficult for them, they haven't got the time to support parents with theseissues the time to support parents with these issues are often and it shouldn't be falling on nurse therese, it should be hmrc, government and local authorities working together to make sure that pa rents working together to make sure that pa re nts ca n working together to make sure that pa rents ca n access working together to make sure that parents can access the support they are entitled to. presumably were pa rents are entitled to. presumably were parents haven't been able to come to some arrangement with the nursery, they will not had any other childcare. what are you doing in terms of contacting the government, what reassurances have you been given that these glitches will be sorted out quickly? it is a massive problem for parents. it could be costing parents thousands of pounds. ifa
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costing parents thousands of pounds. if a parent can't get a job because of these problems, it is a real issue. the government tells us they are looking into these issues but we are looking into these issues but we are seeing actor as i can problems in september when it was launched, there has been another spike recently because every three months the parents have to reconfirm their eligibility for support. these pa rents a re eligibility for support. these parents are facing the same problems that they faced before. the government are trying to reassure ourselves and nurseries about these issues but ultimately personal problems that need to be addressed. barry mcelduff, the sinn fein mp who sparked anger over a social media post which unionists said mocked victims of the ira, has resigned. mr mcelduff posted a video of himself on twitter with a loaf of kingsmill bread on his head on the 42nd anniversary of the murders of ten protestants in the village of
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kingsmill in south armagh. he was suspended by his party for three months, but this morning, announced he is standing down as an mp. the deep and unnecessary hurt that this video has caused the families of the victims of kingsmill is undoubtedly my deepest regret and they do offer again my apologies to they do offer again my apologies to the families and the wider community for the consequences night i want to be adamant about this. not for one second, not in a million years would i have made a connection between the terrible atrocity at kingsmill and the brand name of the product. i certainly would not have posted that we'd had made any connection whatsoever in my mind. 0bviously
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we'd had made any connection whatsoever in my mind. obviously it is very important for me to get the chance to say that. i genuinely did not make that connection, not for a second did i make that connection in my mind. i want a say in relation to kingsmill itself, kingsmill was wrong. absolutely wrong. kingsmill was unjustifiable and sectarian and it never should have happens and i am an irish republican and there is not a sectarian bone in my body. there was no intended reference to kingsmill in my tweet, but i actually do except that there are many people who don't believe that. that is difficult for me but i have to a cce pt that is difficult for me but i have to accept that many people don't believe that. tributes are being paid to the former west brom and england forward cyrille regis, who has died aged 59. an outstanding striker and a pioneer for black footballers in england during the late 1970s, he played for ‘the baggies'
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between 1977 and 1984. he went on to win the fa cup with coventry in 1987 and returned to the hawthorns as a coach before becoming an agent. i spoke earlier to adrian chiles — a life—long west brom fan, and personalfriend of cyrille regis. they made the documentary whites vs blacks together in november 2016. i asked him to share his memories of cyrille regis. it isa it is a slightly fatuous comment but every time he saw temp two you thought he was getting younger all the time. he was a magnificent physical specimen as a player and every time i saw him, i said to him just before christmas, what is your secret because physically do you seem secret because physically do you seem to get better all the time? wasn't my man love for him just, it was i everyone else felt about him. i thank you for your condolences to me, but there are so many people
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that are so close to him in the midlands especially and in the game generally. every black footballer i know of a certain age and many others, ian wright would be one who was speechless this morning, couldn't find the words. it was such an inspiration, such a trailblazer. my an inspiration, such a trailblazer. my particular thoughts are with brendan batson today. the famously had the three degrees, laurie cunningham cyril's best friend died ina carcrash cunningham cyril's best friend died in a car crash in spain many years ago. now it isjust brendan in a car crash in spain many years ago. now it is just brendan left. you imagine how he must be feeling this morning. he and cyrille were very close indeed. they blazed such a trail. into what it was like to be there in the 1970s. i was a little white kid from a middle—class area, but all that area around birmingham and the black country, there were a few teething problems to say the least with multiracial britain, a lot of racial tension there, and then suddenly these three, but
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especially cyrille for me, burst onto the scene. he so quick, so powerful and feared by the opposition. there we were, a load of white people just loving opposition. there we were, a load of white peoplejust loving him, just adoring him. he had such an impact. what did he say to you about that time coming up through the game about his love for the game, also about his love for the game, also about the racial abuse he suffered? the documentary i made, it is a slightly long story, but what i learn from it was that i was there at the time but you kind of had forgotten how bad it was for them and getting them just to tell those tales, having bananas raining down on them, monkey noises, racist tau nts on them, monkey noises, racist taunts from opposition fans, but also opposition players and even their own players in the dressing room, it was just so hard. their own players in the dressing room, it wasjust so hard. many players didn't have the mental strength to do it. there were some great football is to never got because they weren't as mentally strong as brendan and cyrille. they
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told me they just strong as brendan and cyrille. they told me theyjust challenged —— channel b anger, the hatred and make them better players. i called cyrille just before muhammad ali's funeral that they covered for radio five live in louisville. i asked what he meant to him. he said as a young black man growing up in west london, he said just to see her black man back them on telly saying iam the black man back them on telly saying i am the greatest. youth had no idea what a mentor blackburn. actually, cyril cyrille wasn't muhammad ali, he was much more self—effacing, but cyrille was a beacon, cyrille was the greatest, not just cyrille was a beacon, cyrille was the greatest, notjust for west brom fans, and many black footballers, he was the greatest. a great inspiration for so many people in so many different ways. a driver and passenger in california have had a narrow escape, after a spectacular crash ended
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with their car embedded in the first floor of an office building. the accident happened in santa ana in orange county. the car hit the central reservation before being hurled into the air and crashing through the wall of the building. both the driver and the passenger received only minor injuries. in a moment the news at one. first, the weather. last week was a decidedly quiet affair. this week, the weather is farfrom quiet. a lot going on. we started off with soggy weather earlier today with rain in many places and behind the main band of rain we have seen a real rash of showers packing in from the north—west. heavy showers, but increasingly wintry showers in north—western areas because the showers are being blown in on a north—westerly wind which will bring very cold air all the way across the
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country. for this week we will see cold weather, windy weather, and there will be some showers, which will be wintry. 0ver high ground in the north we could see quite a lot of snow accumulating. through this evening and overnight, the showers we re evening and overnight, the showers were packing from the north—west, increasingly turning even to low levels in northern ireland and scotland. there is the risk of ice of all of —— in all of these areas. it will be a cold night, less cold in the site. for tuesday morning the snow will be starting to pile up across high ground in scotland, although not exclusively on high ground. icy stretches are likely. ice for northern ireland, northern england and dining to wales. the showers here will mostly be falling as rain at low levels, but snow on higher ground. largely drive for east anglia and the south—east. rain showers in the south—west of england, although
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in the north—westerly wind, which is likely to reach gale force at times. there will be a lot of showers, some sleep, some snow, but also some hail and punter. adding the strength of the wind, this is what the buffalo tomorrow afternoon. subzero and many central and northern areas. wednesday, strong north—westerly winds, wintry showers in the northwest. but then we have a slightly different type of weather to co nte nt slightly different type of weather to content with. a bit of uncertainty about the exact detail of this but it looks like we would see a deep area of low pressure moving in on wednesday night. to the side of it, severe gales, to the north the potential for some snow. that disturbed weather should clear away quickly on thursday morning then we are back into the cold winter with wintry showers, temperatures between three and 11 degrees. as. 20,000 jobs at risk as one of the uk's biggest construction companies goes into liquidation. the construction giant carillion is involved in major projects like the hs2 high speed rail line and the management of schools,
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hospitals and prisons. we will be asking what went wrong at the company and what it means for jobs and the services it provides. also this lunchtime... fears of disease spreading in the world's biggest refugee camp — almost half a million rohingha children are being vaccinated in bangladesh. i'm ina i'm in a refugee camp where people are living in the most difficult of conditions and a british medical tea m conditions and a british medical team is trying to bring a deadly outbreak of diphtheria under control. scotland's first minister warns that a hard brexit could cut scotland's economy by more than £12 billion a year.
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